Puppy mills are still a problem

Re: Pet store owners oppose ban, Burnaby NOW, July 17 Of course the owners of Pet Habitat and King Ed Pets oppose a ban, as the retail sale of pets is likely the primary source of revenue for these stores.

While (Pet Habitat owner Tom) Peters argues the breeding industry should be regulated, and that should be the focus of our efforts, he fails to mention that the majority of his puppies come from the United States, therefore, Canadian breeding regulations would have no impact on him.

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Further, he argues that all the breeders are American Kennel Club certified and U.S Department of Agriculture regulated.

As indicated in several investigative reports (see bit.ly/19ipuPB and bit.ly/135u7Jc), neither of these designations ensure the humane treatment and strict breeding practices.

This is unlike the Canadian Kennel Club, which actually prohibits its members from selling their animals through pet stores.

The mere fact that these facilities have to be USDA inspected indicates that they are large scale "farm" like operations.

Simply put, no reputable breeder would sell their animals through a store. They want to ensure that they are going to a proper home. It is not uncommon for these breeders to do home and reference checks, and they will always take the animal back, at any point in that animal's life.

I also find it curious that he is so adamant that his puppies do not come from puppy mills, when there has been so much evidence that clearly shows the Hunte Corporation gets its puppies from mills.

In addition, an undercover investigation of the Hunte Corporation (see bit. ly/14512sW), clearly shows animal welfare concerns in their operations. He also failed to mentioned that just last week, based on complaints from the community, B.C. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals conducted an investigation and ordered actions (some immediate and some to be done over the coming weeks).

Kathy Powelson,

Paws for Hope

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